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Quick search for "dewalt dw3401 motor wire manual" yielded a manual. Wiring diagram on page 15 of pdf. There are different variations shown. Your motor has a 1-phase symbol on the far left side of the nameplate, which is what you need. The diagrams with the 1-phase motor have the capacitor connected to brown and black. This is consistent with your ...


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The short answer is, use a ‘multi-level’ BOM. Each subunit in the BOM has its own BOM and design data that report in to the part number for that subunit. Add as many levels as needed for your product, including a finished good in a carton. Another task you face is creating a part number system. As you do that, think about how to distinguish items as they ...


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Often the wire harness will have its own part number which you can ask for on a BOM. This treats the harness as a single component from the BOM point of view. The description for that part number will refer to the harness's own drawing number, BOM, and assembly procedure (and possibly drawings for the jig needed to assemble it). Your spool of wire will then ...


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we will order a spool of wire, and then cut it to required lengths to then be crimped and inserted into a connector, should the spool be a BOM item, and then the cut wires be entered as sub-assemblies created from it? Each cut wire can have a fractional quantity of the bought in spool. BoM software easily deals with this. The fractional part of the bought ...


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It's typically best if the BOM reflects the assembly process. Start with the final product (or whatever goes in the box to be shipped) and work backwards through the subassembly. If the harness gets build on the final line, than only the parts (wire, crimps, etc.) should be in your BOM. If it shows up on the line pre-assembled, than it's a subassembly with ...


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So I am interpreting this as options that don't involve crimping. I take it you don't insist on soldering. Insulation displacement connectors (IDC) are an option for small gauge signal connections. As long as you use the appropriate wire they work pretty well. For example the CR series from JST interconnects with PH series connectors which are very common. ...


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I have a couple of designs in production were we've had issues with poor crimps. While generally speaking I agree with others who have said "get better at crimping", here's what we did as a work around which works fine: Buy pre-made cables and cut them, then solder and heat shrink. It's time consuming, and more expensive, but it provides excellent ...


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PCB Pin headers? I have used 2.54 pitch male and female pin headers during prototyping for years. If I feel like some vibration resistance / "reliability" I use a bit of tape or crimp tube. There are thousands of options, both in size and design. I use the most simple 1x32 strips and cut off as much as I need. These fairly reliable, but if I need ...


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I resisted crimp technology for many years, preferring solder because it was more "professional", until I saw good evidence of the superior reliability of crimped connections. Nevertheless, if you have a strong preference for soldering, I suggest you search using the keyword "solder seal". You'll find a huge number of connectors ...


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First, the exercise is intended to present an absurd answer (I assume they're using it to lead in to the use of high-tension wires). Second, blackbody radiation is used for more than things that are perfectly black. The Stefan-Boltzmann equation is only valid for things with a perfectly black surface -- but it's easy to adjust it's effects based on the ...


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250 A is lots of current. This table says you need AWG 0000 to support 250 A if it is a bundled power line and AWG 00 if the wires are short and far apart ("chassis wiring"). It already does not look like just a wire, and you may easier find it where plain copper is for sale. You need a copper pipe where the copper would make at least 107 mm^2 in ...


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A voltmeter, if you need to power exactly this kind of device, draws very little current. A thin gauge is more appropriate. Even wire as thin as 28 AWG can handle 226 mA for power here) and differently from the monstrous 12 AWG is more likely to burn out without other damage if you short circuit anything by chance. 12 AWG may hold over 40 amps when you do ...


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Tap into the fused power switch seems like the best access point. Wire gauge is irrelevant for the expected uA of current to a DMM.


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When wiring low voltage circuit not only amperage should be taken in consideration. Drop voltage is important too because voltage drop should not be over some percentage of source. In case like yours voltmeter consume milliamperes or even micro so it will be OK. Fuse is protecting wires from overheating and catching fire, so value should be chosen according ...


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In the amp-gauge table and many websites, the 12-gauge wire capable of delivering 20A. Check here Usually, a Voltmeter is not drawing over 0.5A. and using 20ga wire is okay, tapping into 12ga wire is okay too. But for safety reasons, you can fuse 0.5A or 1A fuse in between your 20ga wire to the voltmeter. Image source: 12 Volt Planet - Fusing Guide EDITED: ...


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The voltage or current you apply at one end of a pair of wires can be detected directly at the other end. It's like pulling on one end of a tight string -- you can feel the pull at the other end. When communicating wirelessly there is no quality of the source that can be directly felt or measured at the other end. It's like you're standing in one end of a ...


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None of them are actually a square wave. They all are approximations. It would take a noise free channel with infinite bandwidth to transmit a true square wave.


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True square waves do not exist because they require an infinite frequency range, in the real world they will always get rounded off a bit. Copper and fiber have an awful lot more frequency range than anything you can send over a radio signal and thus they don't get rounded off as much.


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The physics of antennas plays a large part. To understand this, you must consider the Fourier transform of your signal. For a simple binary NRZ code, where 0 is 0V and 1 is some voltage, Most of the Fourier energy is contained within the frequency range 0-B/2, where B is your bitrate. But antennas are frequency-selective: at the high end, an efficient non-...


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Along with all the bandwidth and other considerations mentioned, the main reason you don't transmit your data directly is that everyone would be transmitting at the same frequency. Take Ethernet. It uses two (or more) pairs of twisted wires to carry two separate channels of information (your Ethernet card sends data on one pair and receives it on the other ...


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tl; dr: RF needs a carrier, cable can use baseband. Both are band-limited, RF systems using carriers more so. A perfect square wave has infinite harmonics. A good square wave has a large number of them. Because of this, square waves use a lot of bandwidth for the information they carry. They’re very inefficient. This limits their use to lower speed signaling,...


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Due to the sharp edges, a square wave has a wide spectrum with lots of harmonics. You could send that over the air with an antenna, but: 1- Signal shape will be distorted at the receiver due to limited bandwidth 2- It will use a lot more bandwidth than it needs to. For radio transmission you want to use as little bandwidth as you can, and not emit any ...


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