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Different wireless technologies can work in very different ways. Any technology can in theory be used in any frequency band. However two present in the same band will tend to interfere with each other's signals unless special precautions are taken. For example WiFi, bluetooth, microwave ovens and car door keys all use 2.4 GHz. But if a badly maintained (...


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They overlap a lot. Wifi and bluetooth and a number of bespoke wireless communication systems share the same frequency band... as does your microwave oven, for that matter. It's the protocol that differentiates them, not anything to do with what frequency you run them at. You could theoretically use wifi at a completely different frequency, if you had a ...


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Appearance of RTS/CTS signaling presumes the CSMA/CA implementation is supplemented in your application with Multiple Access Collision Avoidance, a technique used to fight hidden/exposed terminal problems. It is unclear if you ask about scenarios which the technique is designed for, or you have concerns about a station violating the CSMA/CA + MACA protocol ...


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Will that affect the whole network? All stations that now lose packets are affected. I.e. every station at which your malfunctioning's station is strong enough to damage received packets. How this kind of an issue is handled? Well, since that bad station won't always have something to send, it will probably not be handled at all: packets that collided ...


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Since this question is asked very often and it's not easy to find clear answers from internet (well, there are, but there is also just as much misinformation,) I feel that I should write here my findings - even though the original post is quite "oldish." The OP's link about the device is not working anymore, so I'm assuming we are talking about the ...


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