0
\$\begingroup\$

I'd think that switching a relay with 120V AC at the coils would not work due to this: https://gyazo.com/2a26aab1dbc70d3da16d0e5e31f1e759

Is that correct? If so, does that also mean 48VDC is the max voltage the coils of this relay can handle?

What I'm trying to do is switch on/off a small current using a larger one, so that a microcontroller can detect when it is on or off. Is there a easy/cheap way of doing this? Thank you.

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • \$\begingroup\$ You power a relay coil with whatever voltage it's been designed to be powered with. That graphic just shows the options available for a particular range of relays and doesn't identify any one relay in particular. \$\endgroup\$
    – Finbarr
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well that actually answers my question. So even if 48VDC was the rating for mine, 120VAC would not work. Darn. Need to figure out another way without relays then probably. \$\endgroup\$
    – user137806
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, you could just use a relay with a 120V coil instead of that one. \$\endgroup\$
    – Finbarr
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'll try to find something like that before buying these: amazon.com/C-J-design-Current-Sensor-Arduino/dp/B00XT0PL20/… since these are a bit expensive. \$\endgroup\$
    – user137806
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, I found 120V coil relays, but they are quite a bit more expensive than these current sensors I found. Looks like these current sensors are going to be my best bet. Thanks guys :) \$\endgroup\$
    – user137806
    Apr 7, 2017 at 9:59

1 Answer 1

0
\$\begingroup\$

You can find a non-contact current sensor like this one (https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11005) that works off the magnetic field created by current in a line.

\$\endgroup\$
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.