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I’m just curious what kind of protection you would typically expect to see on a battery powered circuit. Circuit in question is a simple 24v dc relay controlled motor. Main power source would be 2x car batteries in series or temporarily a back up lipo/li-ion pack. Motor rated current is 2A but I may also do another with a (24v dc) 5A motor.

I know an AC mains circuit would have breakers, fuses in addition to whatever protection is offered by the psu or motor driver itself but I know very little about portable or battery powered electronics.

The motor was expensive and I want to keep it, the batteries and myself safe. Would a simple linear voltage regulator provide ample voltage, over current and reverse polarity protection on the circuit side of things?

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I know an AC mains circuit would have breakers, fuses in addition to whatever protection is offered by the psu or motor driver itself but I know very little about portable or battery powered electronics.

Exactly the same. It's electricity. It damages stuff if too much current flows.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks. With the myriad of PCB components I was hoping there would be something automatic. I wanted to avoid a potential scenario to have to open the casing and flick a breaker switch or replace a fuse should the motor have too much load and trip it. In the case of the 2A motor the linear voltage regulator looked just the trick? Stepping the inconsistent battery voltage down to a stable 24v whilst offering a 2A maximum output current with thermal protection all in one tiny package. \$\endgroup\$ – Sausage Oct 27 '18 at 11:28
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Main power source would be 2x car batteries in series

Car batteries would be a very bad idea.
A car battery can only be deep discharged about 12 times.

Lead acid batteries are starting or deep cycle.
You need a deep cycle, not a car battery.

See Starter and Deep-cycle Batteries on this page: How does the Lead Acid Battery Work?
And: Summary Table of Lead-based Batteries

Would a simple linear voltage regulator provide ample voltage, over current and reverse polarity protection on the circuit side of things?

Lead acid batteries are very resilient to abuse.

You would be best served with a Deep cycle AGM lead acid as they can provide instant high load currents on demand.

Li-ion will work very well. Requires bigger budget than lead acid.
Best would be a Li-phosphate, LiFePo4 (LFP).

Li-phosphate is the Li-ion used in lead acid replacement for motorcycles (affordable) and automobiles (no so affordable). Double as starting and deep cycle.

See: Types of Lithium-ion
And: Summary Table of Lithium-based Batteries

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