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Hey folks, I'm working on a device using arm-elf-gcc to compile code for a MakingThings prototype board. My development machine is a Linux box running Ubuntu 9.10. On a different linux box using Ubuntu I got arm-elf-gcc running ok by manually building and installing gcc, after 3 or 4 tries.

I'm trying to pick the best way to install the toolchain, but there doesn't seem to be a best way AFAIK. Setting up on 9.08 and 9.10, both seem to fail except for when I manually build and install the environment.

I have tried Emdebian packages and CodeSourery, and neither of those worked well.

Does anyone have any other good suggestions for doing an arm-elf-gcc setup on a Linux box?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ As a note: for manual build of arm-elf-gcc, I am using a modified version of the instructions at hermann-uwe.de/blog/… \$\endgroup\$
    – Far McKon
    Mar 17, 2010 at 19:39

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I'd say CodeSourcery Lite is the easiest way. The Lite version is just the GNU tools (no fancy IDEs, etc).

It installs cleanly into a single directory, you just need to set your PATH to point at it.

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Here's a pretty good article that partly covers building your own cross compiler toolchain using crosstool-ng. You may find it helpful as I did.

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I think the best way is to manually build and install gcc in one try. ;-)

Though this requires that you do it a couple of times for practice, and my own score was two tries last time (makeinfo was missing when building binutils, again). I use my own scripts, which are similar but separate download and build.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I dunno, I'd much rather have someone else go through all the trouble of figuring out how to compile & package GCC than having to learn that myself. My goal is to write programs, not to maintain toolchains, so learning how to do that is not that useful to me. \$\endgroup\$
    – davr
    Mar 17, 2010 at 21:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, but as far as I know those packages don't exist. (For AVR I use avr-gcc.) \$\endgroup\$
    – starblue
    Mar 19, 2010 at 20:12
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Place your toolchain in something like /usr/local/arm-elf-toolchain and put the appropriate prefixes in your makefiles and you should be alright. I can really recommend putting the toolchain in a seperate directory so you won't mess up your current toolchain(s).

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I've installed the toolchain using tutorial from Madox.

After manual compilation and installation as described in this link everything worked like a charm.

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I agree with Joby Taffey that CodeSourcery probably is a good choice.

However, some time back I started to play a little bit with the stm32 (ST:s arm Cortex M3 mcu) and in the process I create this page.

Maybe it can help you in some sense?

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If you're not averse to upgrading to a more recent version of Ubuntu, then you can just install an ARM cross-compiler from the official repository.

Versions 10.10 ("maverick") and later have a gcc-arm-linux-gnueabi package, and a corresponding binutils. These are in the 'universe' repository.

Source: dak

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The Summon ARM Toolchain script has worked wonderfully for me. Note that this will only work to setup the toolchain for bare metal ARM development and NOT to cross compile for linux ARM targets. For the sake of clarity, that means it won't work to compile a program which can run on linux running on the ARM. Also, this installs the full toolchain, pretty much everything you need to do bare metal work on ARM.

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