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Thanks in advance for any help/advice. I am in the US and attempting to use a solenoid on a CO2 line.

I have a Burkert 0201 solenoid (6V, DC, 4W) as pictured here. It has a molded-in power cord with brown, blue and green/yellow leads with a forked connector. I am unable to open the housing.

Questions:

  1. I have a spare solenoid DIN connector, can I/do I need to use this for my solenoid to work properly? I don't see how I would connect it as there are no DIN prongs on the solenoid.

  2. How do I wire this to a plug so I can connect a timer to switch the solenoid on/off? What items would I need to buy?

I've always had in interest in EE but always hesitate to experiment with these type of things.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Datasheet says? \$\endgroup\$ May 12 '16 at 0:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for replying, this is the only datasheet I could locate \$\endgroup\$
    – Veritas
    May 12 '16 at 3:23
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Well, first off, the solenoid you have is 6V. Assuming the kind of timer you are thinking of using switches line voltage, you'll need to use a power supply of some sort to drop the line voltage to 6V. You shouldn't need a DIN connector.

The three wires you have connected to the solenoid are most likely an armature ground (the green/yellow striped one), and two wires for energizing the solenoid. Based on the datasheet, it appears that the solenoid could be energized with either polarity 6VDC. If you have a 6V battery pack or power supply, you should be able to test this by applying +6VDC to the brown wire and 0V/GND to the blue wire. Leave the armature disconnected for testing (although you could probably connect it to 0V as well with the blue wire).

Assuming this works and the solenoid activates when you applied 6VDC, all you need to do is figure out what kind of timer you need. The timer needs to be able to control a 6VDC load at 4W. If you already have a timer that switches line voltage, you will be able to use a power supply (like this one: http://goo.gl/Ich2F0) to produce the 6V you need to power the solenoid. If you are using something like a 555 timer IC circuit, you will need to use a transistor rated for at least 1A to drive the solenoid from 6VDC. Keep in mind that the solenoid is an inductive load, so a flyback diode will probably be needed to protect the transistor switch if you do go this route.

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