1
\$\begingroup\$

I want to buy a linear solenoid that has the following specifications in the Datasheet:

  • 24 VDC
  • 9W 100% Duty Cycle
  • 18W 50% Duty Cycle
  • 36W 25% Duty Cycle
  • 90W 10% Duty Cycle

And the following force-stroke curves:

enter image description here

I have a power supply of 24VDC and 10A. Since I don't know the coil resistance (at 20 °C), how can I know the current that would go through the coil?

In other words, do I have to assume that at 24V the curve that represents the behaviour of the solenoid corresponds to 100% duty cycle and 9W? And the other curves are only for higher voltages than the rated voltage of 24 V?

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • \$\begingroup\$ Decent datasheets should specify the current vs actuation/field strength/something. The graph you linked doesn't tell a thing. Do you have a link to the datasheet? Though in case 24V can be regarded as 24.00V in this example, you can probably calculate the currents based on power. Just note than in a real application, voltage and resistance will vary, you should regulate it with constant current. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    May 2, 2023 at 14:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ The link of the datasheet is link . I was aware of the varaition of resistance due to a temperature increase (which translates to a current decrease), but I thought voltage should remain constant during operation. \$\endgroup\$ May 2, 2023 at 14:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Depends a lot on the application. You should also have some graph in the datasheet showing temperature curves. What you linked isn't a datasheet, it is a product brief labelled "datasheet". Don't buy crap that doesn't come with proper documentation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    May 2, 2023 at 14:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ You need to know the resistance. Ask the vendor; or find a better one. \$\endgroup\$
    – user16324
    May 2, 2023 at 14:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the advice! I will do that. \$\endgroup\$ May 2, 2023 at 14:44

1 Answer 1

0
\$\begingroup\$

I have a power supply of 24VDC and 10A. Since I don't know the coil resistance (at 20 °C), how can I know the current that would go through the coil?

From the information you state....

  • 24 VDC
  • 9W 100% Duty Cycle

It's a fair assumption that the current from a 24 volt supply would be 375 mA or thereabouts. The solenoid would have a DC resistance of 64 Ω.

  • 90W 10% Duty Cycle

That's basically an average of 9 watts i.e. 90 watts for 10 percent of the time. That puts an upper limit on the pulsed voltage of 75.89 volts because: -

$$\text{Voltage}_{MAX} = \sqrt{Power\times Resistance}$$

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Very useful, thanks! So using my power supply (24V 10A) I guess I should expect a force-stroke curve like the green one? Anyways I will try to find a better documented product. \$\endgroup\$ May 2, 2023 at 14:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, the green curve applies to a constant 24 volts applied. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    May 2, 2023 at 14:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.