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I designed a basic power amplifier powered by +12V/-12V. During the breadboard testing phase, the bench power supply indicated a stable voltage of +12V/-12V and a current draw of 150mA. After receiving the ordered PCB and soldering all the components onto it, I connected the power amp to my home bench. However, my home bench reached the current limit, and the voltage dropped to around 3.20V. enter image description here

Despite using a multimeter to troubleshoot by placing one pin on the +/-/GND and probing through all other components with the second pin, I couldn't pinpoint the issue. I suspect that the problem lies internally within the PCB itself.

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could provide feedback on my schematics and highlight any design flaws I may have overlooked.

Schematic: enter image description here

PCB: Top layer

enter image description here

Bottom layer

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ It isn't a direct short or the voltage would be lower. Most likely a partial short through a component. Here is a troubleshooting method, but it works best on hard shorts. electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/494327/… \$\endgroup\$
    – Mattman944
    Jan 6 at 10:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ I don’t think -12V should be going to pin 7 on the TL081 nor +12V to pin 4. I suspect you have these reversed. Simply remove your TL081 from the socket and see if the overload disappears. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kartman
    Jan 6 at 10:12

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As Kartman pointed out, pin 7 and pin 4 are reversed. Upon correcting this issue, the IC overload disappeared.

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