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I've been using coil relays for automotive electrical stuff for years, but in the MCU / embedded world there are PWM driven relays as well. I get that 5v will operate the coil on the smaller 10 amp relays, but is 5v at 1 - 2 amps (planning on having a secondary feed halfway down the strip, so 2 relays) enough current to use the coil type. Nearly everything in a car runs at 7 - 10 amps. Seems like it will be fine, I just don't want to find out the hard way it is not and burn the house down.

I will not come close to the open/close limits on the relays and the PWM could introduce lots of noise if it is low quality. Are the PWM type relays robust enough for LED's?

Did some searching and found these Q&A:

Relay Vs MOSFET or IGBT

Long run Voltage drop

Which make me think it is okay, but....

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What are these PWM relays? A quick search shows they might be something RC hobby-related? \$\endgroup\$
    – vir
    Dec 29, 2023 at 16:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ These are the MOSFET relays amazon.com/dp/B07NWD8W26/… \$\endgroup\$ Dec 29, 2023 at 18:42

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Use a fet, relays have a high switching time. Use a low side n-mosfet with a low RDS on. Make sure the Vds is rated for the max voltage across the part. Make sure you don't exceed the gate voltage, and make sure the gate switches fast enough so you don't burn it out. (you want the fet either on or off but not in between as that is when max power is dissipated)

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