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I am an electronic beginner and I do not understand how Uab solves this circuit.

enter image description here

I know how this value get, but I do not understand why it should be done.

enter image description here (1)

I tried to solve it using Kirchhoff's law, but I did not know if this would work.

Please help me, tell me how I can get formula(1).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ well, yes, it would work, show your calculation (you can just $$ \text{Math}\cdot\text{equation}$$ and add it to your question, so that we can help you! \$\endgroup\$ Feb 25, 2018 at 13:03

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Could it be that R1 and R2 are interchanged or V1 and V2? From a conceptual analysis, you really have a voltage divider. Because R1 is equal to R2, the voltage difference between V1 and V2 is divided by two. 5V / 2 = 2.5V. Therefore, the voltage 'Va' will be 2.5V + 10V. Mathematically you can see it in the schematic.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

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