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I have a phone vibrator motor that I want to check. This is what it looks like:

enter image description here

And here is the schematic from the service manual:

enter image description here

The motor is not connected to the circuit. It is by itself as seen in the first image. Opening and closing the phone is not straightforward so I am hoping to test it without having to reassemble the whole phone.

The motor's part number is EAU62024101. The motor controller's part number is ISA1000A. I could not find datasheets for either.

I am a noob so I am not sure how to go about testing it. I see a 3.3V source... Can I just connect the 3.3V line from my Arduino to one terminal, and ground to the other?


Update:
I managed to test it with the phone's circuit using jumper wires. I would still love to hear from anyone who has insight on how you can read the above schematic and deduce an appropriate standalone circuit to test the motor.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Without knowing the current required, I would not connect it directly. Use a simple transistor instead \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Jun 18 '18 at 18:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ How can you determine required current? Also, how would you use a transistor to test it? \$\endgroup\$ – Jet Blue Jun 18 '18 at 19:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ When (al least one wire of) the motor is disconnected from the circuit you could test it with a Li coin cell. \$\endgroup\$ – Wouter van Ooijen Jun 18 '18 at 19:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are many ways to test them but you must educate yourself on either motor specs or drivrer specs and suggested methods to prevent overheating but given optimum fast start stops \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jun 18 '18 at 19:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you don't have a clue you should not to anything that includes that circuit. You risk doing the wrong thing and damaging the chip. Take a 1.5 V battery and connect it to the vibrator directly without the circuit connected, the vibrator should buzz. A common failure with these things are the connections, you might want to carefully pull the springs out a bit so that they connect to the PCB. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Jun 18 '18 at 19:23
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If this motor is very precious to burn, you can start measuring the end-to-end resistance of the terminals. Then start with connecting a big enough (i.e. 10x of the motor) potentiometer that you can adjust the serial resistance between your voltage source and the motor. Good luck.

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