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I feel like this ought to be a FAQ, but because of the abundance of articles on Grade Point Average coming out of the US, it's extremely difficult to search for. I have a micro switch with rather difficult to read labelling on it, but which clearly shows a current rating of 0.1GPA (and 125 VAC): enter image description here I'm used to seeing a simple 'A' after current ratings. What does the 'GP' stand for in this instance?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Rest assured: I've never heard about GPA... \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Oct 8 at 22:14
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To really know, you'd have to have a few hundred dollars to get access to the CUL 61058-1 document. However, it probably stands for General Purpose Amps GPA. The rating is the same as a regular amp, they probably redefine it to differentiate between DC amps and AC amps or to mean both.

enter image description here Source: http://www.state-elec.com/honeywell/pdf/MICRO-SWITCH%20V15.pdf

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I see! Thanks very much. \$\endgroup\$ – Rich Churcher Oct 8 at 22:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ Do general purpose amps cost less than hand-machined special purpose amps? \$\endgroup\$ – TimWescott Oct 9 at 0:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, and you only get them if you live in the US, there are no general purpose amps outside of the US, only regular amps \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Oct 9 at 3:50
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Bottom of page 17 of this Farnell document defines it as “GPA – General Purpose Amps (Inductive Load)”.

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