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IKEA's LED drivers use cables with connectors that seem to be identified elsewhere as "mini AMP".

The socket appears to be a 6mm square, with a ~1mm wide and ~0.5mm high groove opening at the bottom centre and a 2 mm wide x 1 mm high rectangle in the upper right corner to ensure proper orientation.

Upper side of the connector has free space on one side which allows it to mate to the socket.

While I can find many examples on European websites, including Amazon, I can't seem to find anything similar in North America. Does someone know a standard name for the connector type in question?

By repeated searches, I've managed to find that "Dupont L813 male" is sometimes mentioned as well.

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These seem to be a variant of ubiquitous "rectangular connector" with latching lock. Here is one at digikey

And here is an interesting topic describing how the misleading name came into being.

On the other end of that cable is LED strip connector XC11. I am not sure if there is some analog from the likes of AMP or Molex for these.

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I noticed your inquiry about the connectors used in IKEA's LED drivers. The connectors you're referring to, often identified as "mini AMP," are actually products from our company. The "L813 male" that you mentioned is our internal product model code. The "mini AMP connector" is an improved version based on the AMP series connectors.

We offer a complete set of products, including:

If you need further information or assistance in finding these connectors in North America, feel free to reach out to us directly. We can provide you with the specific details and help you source the connectors you need.

Hope this helps!

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