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As you can see from the images, this capacitor needs replacement, however I do not know what the top 2 values mean. It doesn't state it's capacitance either...

I assume the first value is decijoule but I am not sure, the middle one just says 33, nothing else.

And the last one is 100 volts.

Also, if someone has any idea on how to replace this, I'd be very appreciated, as the capacitor doesn't seem to be soldered on the back of the board, it on some kind of plastic support, and it has 2 small soderings on the sides. The board belongs to an LG monitor, an LG Flatron 22EA53VA to be precise.

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    \$\begingroup\$ That's a 33µF, 100V cap. The 32aJ marking denotes the type as specified in the factory. You have to consult the datasheet to find out what it means. It does not mean Joule. \$\endgroup\$
    – Janka
    Nov 5, 2017 at 0:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ You simply desolder the leads . They are actually square-shaped wires which lead under the can horizontally, so desoldering can be a bit tricky. The support belongs to the part, you remove it along with the can. \$\endgroup\$
    – Janka
    Nov 5, 2017 at 0:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ SMT = Surface mounted technology. SMD = Surface mounted device. It's the same. \$\endgroup\$
    – Janka
    Nov 5, 2017 at 0:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ "As you can see from the images, this capacitor needs replacement" you can? what makes you think that? \$\endgroup\$
    – Trevor_G
    Nov 5, 2017 at 0:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ Daniel that is a normal marking on those devices... bing.com/images/… It's part of the manufacturing process \$\endgroup\$
    – Trevor_G
    Nov 5, 2017 at 0:55

1 Answer 1

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Considering the physical size and voltage rating i suggest this is a 33uF capacitor. You can desololder it by using a solder tweezer or by hot air (make sure to shield adjacent components with aluminum foul or similar) or by desoldering one leg slightly lift it up and then desolder the second leg. Make sure you find a capacitor model with apropriate physical size and consider the polarity because it is anelectrolytic cap.

Something like https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/de/nichicon/PCR2A330MCL1GS/493-13793-2-ND/4694783

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  • \$\begingroup\$ thanks, i'll pay a visit to the local hardware shop next monday and see if they have similar caps \$\endgroup\$
    – user167924
    Nov 5, 2017 at 0:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Daniel, local hardware shops don't usually have this kind of capacitors. You should shop on-line for SMD components. But why do you think these electrolytic caps are faulty? Your images show no bulging of signs of leaks. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 5, 2017 at 3:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, maybe not, but the top of the capacitor has a bulge. And the monitor problem is when I turn it on, it turns off immediatly after, I have to wait around 15 mins for it to "warm up" so it mantains turned on. Which is usually a capacitor problem. Not sure if the local hardware shop has these, but I'll give it a shot, they have almost anything I could think off. \$\endgroup\$
    – user167924
    Nov 5, 2017 at 11:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ I just came upon this topic as I also have the same problem but with an LG 22EA63V monitor which is behaving the same after a shorted graphics card turned the monitor completely white and a high pitched "zzzzzzttt" was heard for a second or two. Did the OP @Daniel mange to fix his monitor by replacing the capacitor mentioned in the original post? \$\endgroup\$
    – salvu
    Nov 30, 2019 at 13:15

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