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I'm a glass artist and designer and would like to make lamps and pendants. I'm told that I need UL approval for the electrical part. That is all the wiring etc. I know I can have an electrician who can do that part but I'm concerned about the approval. Is that correct? If so what's the simplest way to do it since I'm a one person company.

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    \$\begingroup\$ +1 Interesting question. But what do you mean by "pendant"? I always considered those as jewelry, not electronics (unless you make electronic pendants?). Can you provide an example picture? \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Laplante Mar 11 '13 at 20:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Light pendant, small lights that hang from the ceiling usually over a dinning room table or a kitchen island. here is a link: \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 12 '13 at 14:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ Here is a link, \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 12 '13 at 14:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ lightingdirect.com/pendant-lighting-fixtures/… \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 12 '13 at 14:28
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Buy approved electric parts and integrate them into your design. The whole unit does not have to be approved.

Most of the "DIY" lamp parts you purchase are already UL approved. Something like http://www.lightingdirect.com/international-lighting-pendant-kit-diy-pendant-kit/p2074236 with your pendant is usually OK.

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    \$\begingroup\$ On the product page, which you've linked, I couldn't find references to UL approval (or recognition) or links to the manual. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Mar 11 '13 at 21:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ So does it mean that I can tell buyer's that it's approved? I was told by another designer that the whole fixture as one unit has to be approved. Of course getting the components make sense and makes it easier. I just want to make sure that I'm doing it right. \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 11 '13 at 22:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @varda How are you selling your light? Who is your typical buyer? E.g.: large quantities through distribution, off the back of a truck, through an architectural company. By the way, where do you operate? If you are in the SF Bay Area, I can introduce you to a lighting specialist at local UL. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Mar 12 '13 at 3:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ I sell my work at art shows to the general public and to galleries and design shops at wholesale. They are hand made so no mass production at this time. \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 12 '13 at 14:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Would be interested to be introduced to your lighting specialist. \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 12 '13 at 14:30
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Getting UL certification for a one-off design is waaaay too expensive. And the standards aren't really intended for that anyway. Use approved parts.

Getting UL certification for a couple of copies of a design is still way too expensive. Use approved parts, and buy the relevent UL standards to make sure you comply.

If you are selling wholesale, use approved parts, make sure you comply with the standards, then call a UL certification lab and get a price for certification. You should aim to get certification by inspection -- much cheaper than laboratory testing!

UL 2388 might be a good starting point:decorative lighting, or 48 art forms

You have to PAY for a copy of those standards. Sometimes you can find equivilent standards that are free.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks David. That's very helpful and of course I didn't realize that you can buy or pay for certain standards. How would I find a copy? \$\endgroup\$ – varda Mar 12 '13 at 14:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Follow the links to the UL site, then select from the site menu. You also want to spend some time doing research to see what the other UL standards are, and what other standards organisations are offering. \$\endgroup\$ – david Mar 13 '13 at 2:51

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