New answers tagged

0 votes

Why are some embedded registers password protected?

Note something other people have not addressed: the watchdog is not a strong defense against a (very) buggy firmware. It is meant as a last ditch resort against two scenarios: First and foremost: some ...
user avatar
11 votes

Why are some embedded registers password protected?

Pretty much every watchdog peripheral I've ever worked with requires that an unique number sequence is written to the register on regular basis. In case you write the wrong one, the MCU will reset. ...
user avatar
  • 14.2k
5 votes

Why are some embedded registers password protected?

A similar mechanism is used on newer AVRs (XMEGA and related), though not with a watchdog integrated mechanism. The CCP (Configuration Change Protection) simply does nothing if the sequence fails. ...
user avatar
  • 2,813
22 votes
Accepted

Why are some embedded registers password protected?

These registers have a disproportionally significant effect on the device's reliability, and likewise on the reliability of the surrounding system that the device is integrated in: The watchdog timer ...
user avatar
  • 14k
20 votes

Why are some embedded registers password protected?

The job of the watchdog is ensuring that your software still runs, not that something that just randomly overwrites memory (e.g. a buffer overflow, or plain, an addressing bug) among many other things ...
user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

UART and BLE Simultaneously

I want to know is it possible to run UART and BLE one after the other It is. The whole nRF52 series are designed to support both wired protocols and BT/BLE. Most of the BLE work are shouldered by the ...
user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How to check the functionality of all the pins on stm32?

Where I work, I design and build circuitboards, usually based on MCUs. When I finish a batch of boards I put them into a literal dish-washer. Like this: As long as they are dry before applying ...
user avatar
  • 7,307
1 vote

Calling embedded systems vs. calling embedded electronics

But for "Embedded system", what is "system"? It is clearly nongeneric. Remember "Signals and Systems" from the university. System is defined as a block (or black box?) ...
user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Why does voltage drop 50% only when using a small coin cell battery?

Batteries have an output impedance and when a battery is not designed to provide high currents it has a high internal impedance. That means there is basically a resistor in series with the output of ...
user avatar
  • 47.1k
4 votes

Would writing to same flash address reduce lifespan of MCU

Let's address the x-y problem. Why do you need to write to the vector table? For me that's huge red flag, foreseeing getting bricked devices with RMA labels on them. Because the power brown-out during ...
user avatar
  • 20.8k
1 vote

MPPT input current measurement

If you are trying to do MPPT, then you can just us the output current -- since that is the current (power) you are trying to maximize.
user avatar
  • 13.9k
2 votes

Would writing to same flash address reduce lifespan of MCU

It's not really clear to me why you need to write to the vector table each and every reset. Assuming some manner of bootloader with vector indirection, then: Before writing to any form of flash, ...
user avatar
  • 14.2k
6 votes
Accepted

Would writing to same flash address reduce lifespan of MCU

The physics and electronics of how flash memory really works Quick answers: Since addresses of vector tables are fixed my code writes same values to same memory address of the flash on every startup. ...
user avatar
3 votes

Would writing to same flash address reduce lifespan of MCU

My question is would it reduce the life of flash if I write to same flash memory address on every startup/reset without erasing? In general, writing exactly the same value should not reduce the ...
user avatar
  • 139

Top 50 recent answers are included