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17

I have downloaded the design you are dealing with. The gerber files, all layer files have .PHO extension. Import gerbers into Altium If you rename the files as follows you will be able to open them in Altium: Layer4.pho \$ \longrightarrow \$ Layer4.GBL, this is the bottom layer Layer1.pho \$ \longrightarrow \$ Layer1.GTL, this is the top layer Layer2.pho ...


13

I use the open source utility GerbMerge, it gets the job done nicely. The utility can be found here Edit: looks like there is another version here that could be more up-to-date: https://github.com/provideyourown/gerbmerge


10

In Eagle, the copper "polygons" are made up of many parallel overlapping traces. If the polygon's linewidth is set to something small, like 1 mil, it quickly consumes large amounts of data when converted to Gerber. If you change the polygon's linewidth to something thicker, it will solve this problem. However, it also affects any thermals tied to the ...


10

As of Eagle 7.5, this is indeed possible. It's a simple case of File->Import->Gerber from the layout editor. There is a video demo on YouTube. As others have mentioned, there is no real DRC checking possible of the imported file as the Gerbers contain no information on nets and connectivity. Eagle simply imports all of the various shapes and lines ...


10

The Gerber files do not specify the order of layers. As long as you don't use blind or buried vias, the layers can be stacked in any order. The file names for the individual Gerber files may vary between different CAD systems, and may or may not imply the desired stack-up order. I always included a "readme" file with my PCB order specifying the desired ...


9

If you want to swap the layers directly in KiCAD, the option you need is Edit -> Swap layers. After swapping the layer contents, you can update the layer names in Design rules -> Layer setup.


8

Since image processing using GIMP is an option for you, I am posting this as an answer. From the comments: PNG format is capable of non-rectangular graphics (i.e., for example a circular image with a transparent/non-existent background) This is not exactly true. PNG supports only rectangular graphics. There is no non-existing background concept. PNG ...


8

I am not sure this is a good question for EE.SE, but here's how to do this in KiCad: From the Design Rules menu select Design Rules Choose the Global Design Rules. There you can modify available trace widths/vias. The Custom Track Widths lists the available track widths (i.e. outside of those defined for specific net classes [see below]. And the custom via ...


8

Gerber files don't have a "resolution" as such. They are vector representations - lines, circles, fills. So they can be rendered at whatever resolution is useful at the time - scaled up or down onscreen without pixelating. For manufacture, the Gerbers have a header which explains the units and precision of all of the points. This ensures that they are ...


8

You can find the resolution of a Gerber file by looking at the FS section. The X and Y parts of the FS command give the resolution in each axis. From the canonical Gerber Specification... 4.9.1 Coordinate Format The coordinate format specifies the number of integer and decimal places in a coordinate number. For example, the “24” format specifies ...


8

To make sure that you didn't make mistake, install an external Gerber file viewer (not connected to or produced by KiCAD). Then, after renaming, view the project in this viewer and imagine what others would see. Assuming you corrected the vias accordingly, yes, you can rename the files the way you want in order to change the layer.


7

Change Device to "EXCELLON_24". Here are some lines from a .XLN using Device="EXCELLON_24": ... T01C0.0130 ... T01 X13969Y11517 And here are those same lines in the wrong format using .XLN for Device="EXCELLON": ... T01C0.01300 ... T01 X139686Y115173 This wrong format causes the 10x NC Drill error shown above; I did not check this with ...


6

As you can see here, I was successful in creating a copper layer using some obscure shape as the source image. Pragmatically speaking, the design is simple, but it could easily be more complex. Here is the original image: I created the image arbitrarily in MS Paint, and saved it as a Monochrome BMP image. This is important, make sure it is Monochrome (ie ...


6

Gerber files aren't 'images'. They're manufacturing data that need to be rendered into an image each time. For complex PCBs, this can be slow. Things like polygons needs to be rendered. Smooth and rounded corners need to be rendered. Its sort of like taking a vector graphics image and then adding more metadata to it. Gerbv has an option for fast rendering ...


6

The correct way to modify Gerber files is normally go back to the original CAD files that generated the Gerber files in the first place. Then use that software to modify the design to your requirements and re-generate the outputs. This process does require that you also have access to both the original CAD data files and the use of the CAD program itself. ...


6

No. A standard Gerber format file contains only primitive shapes and positions. It contains no concept of WHAT any of the shapes represent, or even that it is an electronic printed-circuit board. However, the Gerber format is a quite simple and strightforward text file. It can be edited in any low-level text editor. So, if it is worth the time and effort,...


6

There is free software that can you can use to create PCB's and to paneling as well. Example: KiCAD, Open source and multi OS support and it can generate Gerber.


5

The Gerber File Format Specification is freely available and it is indeed an ASCII format that could be edited using a text editor. While human readable it's a vector format so everything on the silkscreen will be formed by a large number of line segments. As you already have the Gerber files I'd recommend opening with a text editor and referencing the ...


5

gerbv - A Free/Open Source Gerber Viewer, part of gplEDA, does what you want. Specifically it is at http://gerbv.geda-project.org/.


5

Yes - it should be possible to view all the Gerbers in the stackup at once and have them line up. The PCB house will flip them according to whether they're "top" or "bottom". See After the PCB is designed, what do I need to check in the Gerber files?


5

So you have got a drill file, in txt format. You can drag this txt and drop into the Altium Designer. You will get the following dialog: Click OK and your drill file will be loaded like this: Now, you can select \$ \textbf{File} \longrightarrow \textbf{Print}\$, set Print Scalling to \$ \textbf{User Scale = 1.0}\$. The page orientation can be set under ...


5

Power planes are always created as negatives. You have a couple of options: Specify to your manufacturer that this layer is a negative. Many manufacturers will ask you the polarity of the layers. (My personal preference) Instead of using planes, use polygon pours. This way there is no doubt, and it's clear where the copper is. The choice is ultimately up ...


5

Use DXF... (it's designed for this) DXF is a file format. It stands for Drawing Exchange Format... as in exchanging CAD data between systems. Export your OrCAD PCB outline and drill holes as a DXF drawing Import your new DXF as a layer into your EAGLE layout Use the new layer to align your EAGLE parts (you may need to do this inside of a part if you are ...


5

First, you need to select the CAM Processor I am sure you will know already (Kinda looks like a camera in the toolbar - see image below) And then it should open a screen the same or similar to the one below: Now you can either add each layer manually, or Eagle does have some default Gerber generators that you can use. If you click on File->Open->Job, you ...


4

They are slow to display mainly because the implementations of most Gerber viewers: Don't treat geometry as geometry, but as primitives that are to be left alone. Are single threaded. Don't use hardware acceleration. It's is very easy to leverage some existing library like cairo or Qt's QPainter to make a proof-of-concept Gerber viewer that runs great for ...


4

You can import vector designs from DXF file into Eagle with the help of this ULP script: http://todbot.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/eagle/import_dxf_polygons_v4.ulp [no connection with the author of the script, found it this morning, worked fine for getting a simple design from Illustrator (exported as an R13 DXF) into Eagle]


4

I use ThisIsNotRocketScience Gerber Panelizer software. It works very well, is open-source, so I can fix edge case bugs myself if necessary, have made and ordered at least 5 different panels with it, without any problems. Here's a tutorial on this software I wrote on this some time ago.


4

The courtyard information and crosshairs shouldn't be included in your gerbers, at least for the PCB fabrication. Each gerber represents some physical feature of the PCB: copper, silkscreen, board edges, etc. When you submitted these files to Advanced Circuits (4pcb.com), it probably asked you to map out (or at least verify) which files represented which ...


4

The mount holes are likely to be a specific drill size and there's usually not many of them. Open the drill file (usually Excellon format and it'll be supplied with the Gerbers) in any text editor and read the raw coordinates, they won't be too hard to find. I don't know Eagle so I won't tell you how to place your new holes on exact positions. When you're ...


4

Essentially, the Gerbers are vector drawings (that PCB fab equipment understands). In a Gerber, you can have a rectangle, but the Gerber doesn't "know" that this rectangle is actually a pad, and it's a part of footprint that has other pads. Gerbers don't carry the schematic information: all traces are just lines (or polylines) for x1,y1 to x2,y2. Afaik, ...


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